Links and Research

Hello again!

Some of the information previously held in this section has been transferred to my new Blog.

The Links and Reading list remain here and will be updated often, so do check regularly.

For those of you [just like me] who do not keep up with silly sounding technology such as 'blogging', it is just my way of writing about some of the textiles I find and are for sale in the shop.

The shop gives me very little space to write and show extra photographs, [and you know how I like to ramble on!]

'This new fashion for Blogging is so very tasteless, my dear. Give me paper any time!'

[Image taken from 'The Keepsake' Nicholas Lavreince. In 'Modes and Manners. Vol IV The Eighteenth Century.'  Max Von Boehn.1935. See full reference in the Book List.

 

To find the blogs, all you have to do is go to the Home Page. Look at the headings at the top of the page. The last heading to your right is: Blog. Click and up it comes!

I don't write a blog about everything in the shop, so do always have a look at all the items available. 

 

 

 

~ My Lords, Ladies & Gentlemen ~

Allow me to introduce to you

JANE

 

I have searched for Jane for many years. Made mistakes!  Thought I had found her, only to realize that it wasn’t her. But finally here she is.

 

Jane is a late 19th Century or possibly early Edwardian wax shop mannequin, with glass eyes and real hair.  You will see similar mannequins in the book ‘ Vintage Hats & Bonnet’s, 1770-1970′ by Susan Langley [USA] and in ‘The Department Store. History. Design. Display’ by Jan Whitaker. [Thames & Hudson.]  Despite being Victorian, Jane is called by this name because she can be Jane Capper, the 18th Century seamstress, whose wonderful needlework I have sold, or the Regency Jane Austen, or Victorian Jane Eyre.

 

She is timeless.

 

Jane is darkened with age, but so full of history. Maybe I will find out how to restore her. Maybe I will leave her alone! But she is now an absolute focus for Poppies Cottage Department Store, especially for my bonnets and caps, perelines and capelets.

 

~Jane arrived  by the most extraordinary coincidence.

Both her previous loving owner and I believe that it was just meant to be~

 

 

Fabulous link!

I was utterly unaware of this wonderful resource in London until last year.Regular, wide ranging courses are run for everyone interested in historic dress, from experienced collectors to students.The ‘star cast’ of this organisation is simply unbelievable. Dame Vivienne Westwood is amongst the patrons, Santina M Levey, known by us all for her expertise in lace and textiles, is amongst the trustees and Jenny Tiramani is Principal with a superb teaching team.Anyone who reads these links simply must visit the website and be amazed!

 

http://theschoolofhistoricaldress.org.uk

Lots more links below!

Poppies Cottage Ditti!

Poppies Cottage Department Store Study is welcoming and warm towards everyone!  We have a philosophy of continuing learning about historic costume & textiles. Knowing that we know more than some and less than others, we are thrilled to share the study with both experts and beginners alike.

 

Whether you want to contribute with information, or simply browse and enjoy, you will be valued equally.

[For silks and polychrome fabrics]

CREASE, FOLD AND LET SUN IN

THROW YOUR MONEY IN THE BIN!

KEEP IN SHADE AND ROLL TO STORE

YOUR CLOTH WILL LAST FOREVER MORE!

[For all white cottons and linens]

RUB, SCRUB, WRING OR SPIN

THROW YOUR MONEY IN THE BIN!

SOAK, SQUEEZE AND BE SO CARING

THIS ANTIQUE CLOTH YOU’LL SOON BE WEARING!

 

[For antique dresses with full skirts or beads]

DON’T HANG IT BY THE SHOULDERS

THE STRAIN IS JUST TOO GREAT

THAT HEAVY SKIRT WILL WEIGH IT DOWN

& THE TOP DISINTEGRATE!

PUT IT IN A NICE BIG BOX

SEAL IT FROM THE AIR

ADD SOME TISSUE, ACID FREE

& YOU WILL GIVE IT TIP TOP CARE!

 

Poppies Cottage Links

Poppies Cottage Study is a little random and haphazard, just as every 18th Century cottage environment should be: Do not expect alphabetical order and meticulous sub-divisions!

So here, in no particular order, is a list of sources to please the textile historian & recent enthusiast alike. A work in progress, it will expand and grow as we continue to learn & research …………………….

* I am breaking a rule. It is for a good reason. All the references listed here have so far been with knowledge of the source. As in, personal knowledge and permission. This reference is for BETHANY. You know who you are! She found Poppies Cottage Links & Research for a homework project, and being a teacher for my professional career, how can I resist including her recommendation? Well done Bethany - a super referral! People like you will, on researching the Regency period, discover exciting careers for the future; the study of History maybe, or Fashion Management [my eldest daughter followed this as a career!], Architecture, the Arts. Endless possibilities!

Here is Bethany's link for us all to share - recommended!

 http://blog.lulus.com/resources/regency-era-fashion-history-culture-and-lifestyle/

* www.heather-toomer.com - If you take a look at my booklist below, you will find that Heather Toomer has helped me hugely through her publications. Lace and whitework  are her key interests, all linked to their uses throughout the centuries. My regulars will know that I am a complete whitework geek, and that I have always struggled with lace identification! Ms Toomer is my hero!  Her new book is now OUT and I have been so selfish! I have devoured it, without telling you! The book is the sequel to ‘Embroidered with White’ [2008] and is called ‘White-embroidered costume accessories the 1790s to 1840s.’ If you are a lover of whitework embroidery, if you collect early accessories, if you are serious about embroidery, then this book is essential in my opinion. In fact, both are essential as they follow one on from another. Georgian and Regency embroidery research I have not found elsewhere!

* www.heirloom-knitting.co.uk Sharon Miller must be one of the most knowledgeable experts on historic knitting. She has completed the most amazing research on Queen Charlotte’s 18th Century cap [see Bonnets & Hats]. I seem to have known her for years, but have only just discovered her wonderful knitting website. If you want to buy the most exquisite wool, or can knit beyond my standard of ‘knit one purl one’ [!!!!], do take a look at this site.

 

* http://lacenews.net – now this is special. Just discovered, here is a lady with years of lace knowledge & expertise, who works completely without bias, to celebrate the history of lace. She regularly includes Ebay listings in her blog, that may be of interest to lace enthusiasts. No comments on price, no promotions, just interesting lace! And then, so much more! She also has a presence on youtube – Go to http://www.youtube.com/user/lacenews So many superbly generous historians out there, with no agenda but to spread the word!

 

* www.madaboutfans.com – An established site from an expert in antique fans & a long term source of advice for Poppies Cottage Victorian gowns as well! Amazing fans through history.

 

* http://thegoldenscissors.blogspot.com/

 

* http://18thcstays.blog

 

 http://www.lacenews.netspot.com/ 

 

* http://southcoastliving.org/

- All the above 3 for anyone who adores 18th Century clothing and fashion history!

 

* www.rosemaryhawthorne.co.uk - An expert in historic costume for many years, Rosemary Hawthorne is RADA trained and has written several books [see booklist below]. With a wealth of strings to her bow, she is incidentally very funny! The website tells all.

 

* www.antiqueirishlace.co.uk – If you are ever in Ireland, this museum and shop will be an essential visit. Glorious antique lace!

 

* www.trouvais.com – Is your life shaped by texture, colour, light, shade & form? Visit this blog and be inspired

 

* http://www.etsy.com/shop/AntiqueHistorika

 

* http://www.etsy.com/shop/Historika

 

* http://historikal-modiste.blogspot.co.uk/

All the above three are devoted to historic costume, mostly focussed on the Regency period. A delight to read and look at, you will find reproduction underpinnings and restored textiles for sale, as well as gorgeous research.  A lovely find!

 

* VISIT: If you are close to South Devon, the following two museums are a must visit! You can find details through the Totnes Information Centre, because they do not yet have a dedicated website. The museums are closely linked, so contact one and they will help with the other!

– Totnes Costume Museum, 43 High Street, Totnes, South Devon. TQ9 5NP. [Check opening times for this fabulous venue]

– Totnes Elizabethan House Museum, Totnes, TQ9 5RU. [ A merchants house built 1575 – Amazing history!]

 

* http://ladysrepositorymuseum.blogspot.com/ I have known Rachael for a few years and have huge admiration for her. Truly knowledgeable about early dolls, she is also an avid collector of  18th Century costume and has her own  museum.  Most of all, she has so much enthusiasm and a great sense of fun. Why are costume collectors so delightful? I highly recommend this link. PS! Rachael has been awarded USA’s top 200 craftsperson for 5 years concurrent. Hard to beat!

 

*http://www.etsy.com/shop/TinselandTatters – I have known Flick for several years and love her to bits! She sells at Portobello Road, London, every Friday and Saturday and has now opened an Etsy shop.  Flick has loved vintage for years and has excellent taste! You can also find details of her Portobello sales at www.retrostuff-etc.com.

 

* WATCH – BBC's ‘The Paradise’... A BBC drama production, showing the fortunes of a young girl working in a fine Department Store in the late 1870s. Based on the French book ‘Ladies Paradise’. Look out for display, packaging and haberdashery supplied by your very own ‘Poppies Cottage Virtual Department Store’! Very exciting!

 

* http://www.facebook.com/pages/Antique-corsets-crinolines-bustles/263119877039084?ref=hl Anton Priymak shows his very fine collection on a ‘Facebook’ page in this link. You can see a small selection of his superb underpinnings collection on ‘Poppies Cottage – About’ page. He has bought a number of items from Poppies Cottage over the last few years. I think you have to be a ‘Facebook’ member to see this link in full. And I am not a member! So frustrating!

 

http://invictoriantimes.blogspot.nl/ A new blog that is a joy to the eyes! The author of the blog has been buying from Poppies Cottage for a very long time and she transforms everything into works of art. Just gorgeous!

 

www.atelier-ohm.de http://www.stiftung-ohm.de/ – August Ohm is an artist with a special interest in costume. His website is in German but can be translated via Google or similar. His Foundation has produced the most wonderful catalogue [much more like a book!] which is truly beautiful! I have added it to the booklist. Some items photographed are very early and unlike anything I have seen before.

 

* www.kleidungum1800.blogspot.co.uk – I have seen some very good reproduction Regency clothing, but this lady does the best ever! A joy to see her blog, her skills are extraordinary. Take a look at the Regency ensemble she has constructed and go back in time

 

*www.sophieploeg.com – Sophie is an artist who uses antique lace & fabrics as a theme for some of her work. Fascinating to see antique textiles used in this way. She tells me she is resisting becoming a lace collector, but I’m sure it will take over her life eventually, as it does to the rest of us! Her very interesting blog tells more about her life and work at www.sophieploeg.blogspot.com

 

*Poppies Cottage is now on social media!  Follow us for the latest updates!

Pinterest (http://www.pinterest.com/poppiesc/)

Instagram (poppiescottage1)

Twitter (@poppiescottage1)

*http://pinterest.com/hyacinthoides/ Kelly is someone I have known for a long time now and she has created the most wonderful Pinterest board of Regency clothing from her own collection, but linking the individual pieces with images from the Regency era. Artistic and factually accurate. Kelly has become a true authority on the Regency era of fashion.

********* BIG BIG BIG NEWS! JANE AUSTEN IS ABOUT TO BE THE NEW FACE ON THE £10 NOTE! WELL DONE JANE! I HAVE ADORED THE PICTURE OF ELIZABETH FRY, THE GREAT REFORMING QUAKER, THE FAMILY OF WHOM I HAVE EXAMINED TEXTILES, BUT JANE AUSTEN MUST BE THE BEST NEWS! WONDERFUL WOMEN OF HISTORY LIVE ON …………..

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

******* BIG BIG BIG BIG NEWS!!!!!! THE BBC ARE CURRENTLY PLANNING A NEW SERIES OF WINSTON GRAHAM’S ‘POLDARK’!

CAN’T WAIT!

Oh Demelza, Demelza, Demelza! *******

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Poppies Cottage Book List:

 

Please note that my comments signify my personal opinion only & may not be common to everyone!

 

'Regency Fashion: taking a turn through time. Volume 1: GOWNS. Sylvestra Regency Fashion Collection.. 2015 Pub Kelly Anne Swallow Sylvestra Regency.

 

'Regency Fashion: taking a turn through time. Volume 2: LADIES OUTERWEAR, GENTLEMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S CLOTHING'. Sylvestra Regency Fashion Collection.. 2015 Pub Kelly Anne Swallow Sylvestra Regency.'

 

'Regency Fashion: taking a turn through time. Volume 3: LADIES ACCESSORIES. Sylvestra Regency Fashion Collection.. 2015 Pub Kelly Anne Swallow Sylvestra Regency. - These three volumes were recently published and show a unique insight into a private Regency collection. Quite extraordinary, the author has a superb knowlegde of Regency fashion plates and clothing, as demonstrated on her Pinterest site [see above link], and relates her detailed knowledge to tiny details of the collection. A series to return to over and over again.

 

‘Das Kleid Als Kunstwerk. Mode aus der Sammlung Stiftung Ohm’ August Ohm. 2012. ISBN 978-3-936406-36-8. – all text is in German, but wonderful photography. We need to persuade the author to publish in English! See links above.

 

‘Baby Wore White. Robes for Special Occasions.’ Heather Toomer & Elspeth Reed 2004 Pub: Heather Toomer Antique Lace –superb for dating 19th Century baby gowns and embroidery.

 

‘Embroidered with White’ Toomer & Reid as above. 2008. Pub as above. Essential and wonderful for 18th Century aprons & Dresden work

 

‘White-embroidered Costume Accessories. The 1790s to the 1840s’ Toomer & Reid as above. 2013. Pub as above. I think you are clear by now that Heather Toomer is a textile genius in my opinion! Buy the pair of books for the very best research into early costume accessories. Very scant research has been done until now.

 

‘Lace’ Heather Toomer 1989 B T Batsford.  This book has helped me most of all in my struggle to understand lace identification!

 

‘Buttons & Trimmings from Snowshill’ Althea Mackenzie. 2004 The National Trust –part of a series of 4 books, all essential if you can find them.

 

‘Shoes and Slippers from Snowshill’ Althea Mackenzie – As above -superb & unmissable!

 

‘Hats and Bonnets from Snowshill’ Althea Mackenzie – As above

 

‘The Indentification of Lace’ Pat Earnshaw 1980. Shire Publications.

 

‘An Introduction to Lace’ Gabrielle Pond 1973 The Garnstone Press Ltd –this is the first ever book I bought to learn about lace.

 

‘Childrens’s Costume in England 1300-1900’ Phillis Cunnington & Anne Buck. 1965 A & C Black Ltd.a general book with some good findings within.

 

‘Knickers An intimate Re- appraisal’ Rosemary Hawthorne. Expanded ed 2008 Souvenir Press.immensely readable, funny and informative. Guess what the topic is? See links for more information.

 

‘Costume in Detail 1730-1930’ Nancy Bradfield. 1965 George G Harrap & Co Ltd. If I ever lost it I would be lost. Utterly essential

 

‘A Picture Book of English Costume Part 1: 17th Century’ Victoria & Albert Museum 1937 Board of Education.

 

‘A Picture Book of English Costume Part 2: 18th Century’ as above.  Two old pamphlets with very good photographic images.

 

‘Bags’ Claire Wilcox. 1999 V & A Publications

 

‘Shoes’ Linda O’Keeffe. 1996 Workman Publishing New York.  For the shoe lover, a huge collection of shoes.

 

‘A Concise History of Costume’ James Laver 1969 Thames & Hudson.  A general book spanning Centuries.

 

‘Nineteenth Century Costume’ James Laver 1937 The Victoria & Albert Museum.  A little favourite of mine, gorgeous illustrations of ladies, gents & children

 

‘Queen Victoria’s Sketchbook’ Marina Warner 1979 Macmillan [sketches copyright of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth ll].  Background reading plus charming sketches of the Royal children in their clothing

 

‘The Little Corset Book – A workbook on period underwear’ Bonnie Holt Ambrose. 1997 Costume & Fashion Press USA

 

‘Liverpool Fashion. Its Makers and Wearers [The dressmaking trade in Liverpool 1830-1940] Anthea Jarvis. 1981. Merseyside County Museums.  Excellent micro-introduction to the growth of the costume trade in one area of England.

 

‘Lace in Fashion. Fashion in Lace 1815-1914.’ Patricia Wardle & Mary de Jong. Diamond Jubilee Exhibition of ‘Het Kantsalet’.  Well used at Poppies Cottage.

 

‘Lace Making & Collecting’ A Penderel Moody c1922. Cassell & Co Ltd.

 

‘Fashion: A History from the 18th to the 20th Century’ Boxed set of two Volumes. 2005 Taschen.there are also smaller versions of these wonderful books – essential.

 

‘Historical Costumes of England 1066-1968’ Third Ed. 1970. George G Harrap & Co Ltd

 

‘Through the Looking Glass’ Elizabeth Wilson & Lou Taylor. 1989 BBC Books.  This was published to accompany a very interesting BBC Series following the history of dress from 1860 to the current day. An excellent social history, I found. A book to read rather than for illustrations.

 

‘Hats. A History of Fashion in Headwear’ Hilda Amphlett 2003 Dover.

 

‘18th Century Costume’ Pauline Rushton. 2004 Trustees of the National Museums, Liverpool. Excellent photographs in this slim book.

 

‘In Biba A Graphic Romance’ Delisia Howard, Chris Price, Barbara Hulanicki 2004. Hazard Books.for 1960’s fans!

 

‘Dreams for Sale. Popular Culture in the 20th Century’ Richard Maltby Ed. 1989 Harrap.far more general than fashion, but puts fashion into context. I love the dates of textile inventions!

 

‘The Cut of Women’s Clothes 1600-1930’. Norah Waugh 1968 Faber & Faberan amazing book but I find some parts difficult. Superb quotations on fashion. Probably not best for the beginner.

 

‘The Visual History of Costume Accessories’ Valerie Cumming. 1998 B T Batsfordone of my best used books.

 

‘The Opulent Era. Fashions of Worth, Doucet and Pingat.’ Elizabeth Ann Coleman 1989 The Brooklyn Museum in assoc with Thames & Hudson, USA. A must for the lover of 19th century couture, I bought it from the US and it cost me a fortune! Hopefully will be re-printed by now!

 

‘18th Century Embroidery Techniques’ Gail Marsh 2006 The Guild of Master Craftsmen.a beloved book, adored & treasured. I know it virtually off by heart!

 

‘19th Century Embroidery Techniques’ Gail Marsh 2008 The Guild of Master Craftsmen.

 

‘The Art of Dress. Clothes through History 1500-1914.’ Jane Ashelford. 1996 The National Trust. Absolute favourite of mine. Many a night of good reading. In depth and interesting too!

 

'The Stencilled House’ Lyn Le Grice. 1988 Dorling Kindersley in association with The National Trust. Shows an interior of a Georgian house stencilled throughout. Gorgeous.

 

‘The Coats Book of Embroidery’ 1978 David & Charles Ltd.one of those books one dips into over many years.

 

‘Quilts 1700-2010’ Sue Pritchard Ed. 2010 V & A Publications.fabulous textile book, a favourite.

 

‘Costume at Castle Howard’ 1975 Castle Howard Estates.a slim volume, showing some of the famous Castle Howard costume collection being worn [you don’t get that these days!]

 

‘Fashioning Fashion: European Dress in Detail 1700-1915.’ Sharon Sadako Takeda & KayeDurland Spilker. 2011 Los Angeles Museum of Art in assoc with Delmonico Books/Prestel USA.pure joy to the eye for both the lady and gentleman costume historian. Fabuolous photography, much in close up.

 

‘The Complete Guide to Needlework’ Mary Gostelow Ed. 1982 Quill Publishing another good reference for particular embroidery techniques

 

‘Old English Costumes’ Undated. Harrods & The St. Catherine Press.Superb old book showing mostly Georgian & Regency fashion worn by models. Ladies & gentlemen. Goes up to the Victorian 1860’s.

 

‘Wedding Fashions 1862-1912’ Jo Anne Olian Ed. Museum of the City of New York. 1994 Dover New York. USALovely range of fashion plates.

 

‘The Art of Vogue Covers 1909-1940’ William Packer.1980 Octopus Books. An old favourite, fashion as illustrated in Vogue.

 

‘Textile Dyeing’ Kate Broughton. 1996 Rockport Publishers, Inc.

 

‘Fabric Painting for Embroidery’ 1990 Valerie Campbell-Harding. B T Batsford

 

 

 

~    Happy reading!   ~

 

© 2015 by Poppies Cottage.